Why You Can’t Help Believing Everything You Read

Believe first, ask questions later

Not only that, but their conclusions, and those of Spinoza, also explain other behaviours that people regularly display:

  • Correspondence bias: this is people’s assumption that others’ behaviour reflects their personality, when really it reflects the situation.
  • Truthfulness bias: people tend to assume that others are telling the truth, even when they are lying.
  • The persuasion effect: when people are distracted it increases the persuasiveness of a message.
  • Denial-innuendo effect: people tend to positively believe in things that are being categorically denied.
  • Hypothesis testing bias: when testing a theory, instead of trying to prove it wrong people tend to look for information that confirms it. This, of course, isn’t very effective hypothesis testing!

Source: Why You Can’t Help Believing Everything You Read – PsyBlog

Although this post is almost six years old, it is still interesting reading. It’s certainly consistent with my recent post about Fox News.

The 10,000 Hours Myth

It’s easy to see why the message that anyone can do anything if they try hard enough might be popular.

Unfortunately it’s not true.

via The 10,000 Hours Myth: Practice Predicts Only 12% of Performance — PsyBlog.

No more guilt about not putting in the 10,000 hours.